California Sun

Good morning. It's Tuesday, Oct. 29.
Today's edition: 13 items, < 4 minutes

Firefighters block Kincade Fire but new windstorm looms.
Automakers take Trump's side in fight with California.
And an architectural surprise in downtown Los Angeles.

California on fire

1

Ashley LaFranchi, left, and Stephanie LaFranchi walked through a destroyed family home in Calistoga on Monday.

Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

"We're on the cusp of cautious optimism."

Sonoma County's massive Kincade Fire advanced further on Monday, engulfing 115 square miles and at least 57 homes, as calmer winds provided firefighters a crucial window to gain more control over the blaze. But the respite wasn't expected to last. The forecast called for wind gusts of up to 60 mph to hit the North Bay on Tuesday. Press Democrat | S.F. Chronicle

Airbnb said hundreds of its hosts were offering free accommodations to evacuees through its "Open Homes" program. Airbnb | SFGate.com

See a live map of the Kincade Fire.

  
2

A helicopter dropped water on hills above the 405 freeway near the Getty Center on Monday.

David Crane/L.A. Daily News via Getty Images

In Los Angeles, a fast-moving fire tore across roughly a square mile in the star-studded hills near the Getty Center in Brentwood, prompting tens of thousands of people to flee and destroying at least eight homes. Among the evacuees: Arnold Schwarzenegger and LeBron James. The fire was 5 percent contained as of late Monday. L.A. Times | A.P.

See updates on the Getty Fire from the L.A. Fire Department.

Track fires and view fire cameras across the state.

  
3

PG&E said late Monday that power had been restored to more than half of the 970,000 customers hit by its latest shutdown. Yet even as lights flickered back on, the utility said a fresh shutoff would hit nearly 600,000 homes and businesses across 29 Northern California counties in anticipation of fierce winds on Tuesday. Mercury News | Sacramento Bee

California regulators announced a formal investigation into whether utilities violated rules by cutting power to millions of Californians. CNN | Reuters

Track power outages, and use PG&E's lookup to determine if your address may be affected.

  
4

A CHP helicopter captured images of smoke slinking across Sonoma County.

California Highway Patrol

"People should not be spending lengthy time outside."

San Francisco smelled like a fireplace as smoke from the Kincade inferno blanketed the greater Bay Area, creating air quality that ranks among the nation's worst. Officials said it was likely to worsen yet as winds push still more smoke into the region on Tuesday. Mercury News | Bloomberg

See a live air quality tracker.

  
5

Many of the homes in Santa Rosa's Coffey Park have only just been rebuilt after being leveled by the 2017 Tubbs Fire. Now communities in the area are facing the threat of another terrifying disaster. There's been plenty of talk about reining in PG&E, wrote the L.A. Times, but "what about limits on home building?" L.A. Times

  

Statewide

6

Roughly 40 percent of greenhouse gases in California come from transportation.

In July, California struck a deal with Ford, Honda, Volkswagen, and BMW to follow more stringent emissions rules, defying a Trump administration plan to weaken the standards. Now a coalition of international automakers, including General Motors, Toyota, and Fiat Chrysler, has sided with the Trump administration, saying the rules should be set by U.S. regulators, not individual states. N.Y. Times | A.P.

  
7

California has fewer marijuana retailers than much smaller Oregon. That's because the state lets cities set their own rules, and about 80 percent have said no to cannabis businesses. "60 Minutes" examined how government regulations and black-market marijuana are shattering the promise of Proposition 64. 60 Minutes

  
8

Clockwise from top left: Prairie Creek Redwood State Park, Death Valley, Lake Tahoe, and Hearst Castle.

Mark Manguerra; Thomas Hawk; Frank Schulenburg; Justin Vidamo

The largest Chinatown outside of Asia, rolling dunes at the bottom of the world, and a pink dream palace on the Central Coast. Fodor's put together a checklist of the "25 ultimate things to do in California." Fodor'sTravel

  

Northern California

9

More than 250 Facebook employees have signed an open letter criticizing Mark Zuckerberg's stance that politicians should be allowed to post any claims they want — even false ones — in ads on the social network. "Free speech and paid speech are not the same thing," the employees wrote. Facebook's position, they added, is "a threat to what FB stands for." N.Y. Times | The Hill

  
10

There's a church in San Francisco's Tenderloin that lets the homeless sleep in its pews — no questions asked. Each weekday, more than 200 homeless people find rest and safety in the back pews of St. Boniface Catholic Church, pictured above. The front pews are reserved for worshippers. This sends a message to both the downtrodden and those attending mass, the church says: No person is excluded from its community. Gubbio Project | SFGate.com

  

Southern California

11

Robert Evans and Ali MacGraw in 1970.

Ron Galella, via Getty Images

Robert Evans has died at 89. The maverick chief of Paramount Pictures was the force behind film classics like "Chinatown," "Rosemary's Baby," and "The Godfather." His own story was cinematic, with a raging cocaine addiction, legal fights, financial ruin — and a comeback in the final act. "We didn't strive for commercial," he told Variety in 2002. "We went for original. We fell on our asses on some of them, but we also touched magic." N.Y. Times | Hollywood Reporter

  
12

Rep. Katie Hill's planned departure from Congress has set off a battle to claim control of the Los Angeles area seat the Democrat flipped in 2018. The RedState reporter who published the damaging allegations and explicit photos that led to Hill's downfall urged voters to support Republican candidates. Politico

Hill said she would become a crusader against revenge porn: "I will fight to ensure that no one else has to live through what I just experienced." L.A. Times | L.A. Daily News

  
13

Los Angeles's oldest historical landmark structure, the Bradbury, is a kind of architectural surprise. Behind its nondescript exterior lies a sunlit Victorian courtyard, birdcage elevators, marble stairs, and ornate iron railings. Architect Charles Moore called the downtown office building "one of the most thrilling spaces on the North American continent." KCET | Curbed Los Angeles

The coworking company NeueHouse is taking over the Bradbury's second floor with a gallery, cafe, private offices, and a meditation nap room. Archpaper

  

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The California Sun is written by Mike McPhate, a former California correspondent for the New York Times.

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